Tagoto Cuisine Inn

Warm Aizu hospitality, delicious food

By Elizabeth Scally   Jan 3, 2019 - 2 min read

After a day of learning about the history and culture of Samurai City, Aizu Wakamatsu, you may need a good rest and fortifying food to carry on your exploration. Tagoto Cuisine Inn, just a short walk from the historic and picturesque merchant district, Nanakomachi, is an ideal place to unwind, enjoy delicious local cuisine, and luxuriate in a warm bath and sleep like a log in the spacious and comfortable western and Japanese rooms.

Tagoto is well known for hospitality and carefully prepared traditional meals. I visited in the winter, just before new year, and for dinner, I was treated to a delicately simmered herring, subtly flavored salad, fresh sashimi and a local specialty, tofu made from maize. For the new year, a simmered vegetable dish called kozuyu, is added to the menu. It will warm you up on the coldest of nights.

Breakfast at Tagoto is a feast. You may find on your tray miso dengaku, the miso paste braised eggplant dish that is iconic of Aizu Wakamatsu City. My breakfast included a poached egg garnished with grated onion and seasoned with ponzu sauce. The feature of the breakfast is meppa meshi, steamed rice, and fish in a bamboo container. Few guests will finish all that is offered, so the chefs will often pack a bento box lunch of the leftover rice and pickles.

Note that Tagoto Inn is a place to relax, take your time, and savor the retro atmosphere. The chefs and hosts, all gracious older ladies, ask that guests check in on time, reserve dinner early, and observe a curfew of 11 p.m. so that they can sustain the excellent service.

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Elizabeth Scally

Elizabeth Scally @Elizabeth Scally

The Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program took me to Ehime Prefecture in 1999, and Japan’s culture and beautiful places kept me here. You will see many of my stories on Japan Travel are about places and events outside of big tourist draws. While I highly recommend the big name sights and experiences, I encourage visitors to see and feel the atmosphere off the beaten path, too. I've lived in cities in the Tokatsu area of Chiba Prefecture (Noda, Nagareyama, Matsudo, Kashiwa, Abiko and others) for the last 15 years and have discovered the many cultural, culinary, and historical treasures here which I share with our readers.